Pressures on the Gold Sector – Sentiment on Gold

In our opinion, there are three major reasons why gold stocks have – so far – failed to properly reflect the recent recovery in the gold price. The first one is that many market participants have become convinced that gold prices are now set to go lower. We have recently written about the CoT report; last Friday the newest report was published, and small speculators have now gone net short gold futures for the first time since the late 1990s bear market. What is remarkable is that they have attained this net short position while the gold price has continued to rebound. Admittedly, the rebound doesn't look very convincing on a daily chart; it looks like a bearish flag, hence the continued propensity by speculators to add to shorts, respectively liquidate long positions. However, the  bedrock of large speculator net long positions which we have also discussed in above mentioned article remains intact, and what we said on that occasion continues to apply: it would be a bad sign if that were to change.

 


 

Gold CoT
Gold, commitments of traders: small speculators are now net short for the first time since the late 1990s – click to enlarge.

 


 

Gold, June Future
Gold, the June futures contract. The rebound looks like a bearish flag, and anecdotal evidence suggests that even gold bulls are convinced that the recent lows will have to be retested – click to enlarge.

 


 

Judging from anecdotal evidence – which has to be taken with a grain of salt, but shouldn't be dismissed out of hand – even most prominent gold bulls expect that the gold price will at least have to 'retest' the recent crash lows. They may well be right, as this is what usually happens after a precipitous decline. Prices eventually revisit the lows amid lower trading volume, and if they reverse back up, the retest can be considered successful. The 1987 crash in the stock market provides a good example:

 


 

DJI,1987 crash
The DJIA in 1987: crash, rebound and retest of the initial low – click to enlarge.

 


 

Keep in mind though that if a majority believes things to play out in a certain manner, the market has a habit of complicating things by defying such expectations. Whether that will happen in this case remains to be seen.

 

 

Weak Earnings and Downgrades

The second reason is the fact that most of the earnings reported so far have once again been weak (i.e., they came in 'below expectations'). Tied in with that is reason number three: now that gold stocks have already declined by about 60%, a great many sell side analysts have collectively decided it would be a good time to slap downgrades on them. To be sure, there have been a number of analysts who have acted in more timely fashion in downgrading the sector, but for the most part the usual herd behavior could be observed: they upgraded many stocks after they had risen a lot and now they downgrade them after they have already collapsed, i.e., when it is sure to help absolutely no-one anymore. Over the past two weeks it hailed downgrades on many gold stocks, which has contributed to their inability to put together a half-way decent bounce.

However, as the late 2008/early 2009 period most recently demonstrated, such clusters of downgrade action are often a contrary signal. Once stocks are rated   'hold' or 'sell' across an entire sector by a majority of analysts, the pressure from that source can no longer get any worse. Moreover, whenever analysts are herding and believe only one outcome to be possible, they are usually wrong. We would rather trust the opinion of insiders, as they are putting their own money at risk. As far as we can tell, analysts risk nothing by being wrong, especially when the entire herd turns out to have been wrong at some point down the road (there is safety in numbers). A recent example for how wrong they often are when their opinions are unanimous were the 22 'strong buy' ratings and the lone 'sell' rating on AAPL when the stock hit the $700 level.  By the time the first rating changes were contemplated, the stocks had already lost $250.

 

Mining Costs

Apart from the fact that everybody now 'knows' that gold can only go down further, one of the things that are apparently being extrapolated indefinitely into the future are rising mining costs. However, as this recent article at Seeking Alpha suggests, this view may actually by misguided, as many major input cost items have stopped going up further or have even begun to decline.

There are a number of reasons to believe that this trend might continue. For one thing, recent weakness in commodity prices has caused many mining companies to shelve expansion projects or delay them considerably – often coupled with plans to downsize new projects and lower the associated capital costs. Regarding gold specifically, its real price (or purchasing power) tends to rise during times of economic weakness and/or declining economic confidence. A long term chart of the gold-CRB ratio shows that in spite of its recent decline, gold actually continues to sport very high purchasing power in terms of commodities:

 


 

gold-CRB-10year
Gold relative to the CRB index over the past 10 years – click to enlarge.

 


 

The prices of a number of items that are quite important for mining continue to be rather high however, as e.g. the chart below shows, which we have taken from the above mentioned article at SA:

 


 

tires
Prices of truck tires have risen relentlessly since the year 2000. However, since late 2011 they have begun to move sideways – click to enlarge.

 


 

Truck tires are an important input cost for large scale open pit mines. Many of the large scale/low grade open pit mining projects currently in the development stage are undergoing revisions in light of higher initial and sustaining capital costs. E.g. Kinross has scaled down the size of its Tasiast mine development and has delayed development in order to identify ways to improve project economics; it is just one example of many.

Miners of base metals such as iron ore and copper also have to contend with lower prices for their products and an increasingly uncertain outlook due to the  recent decline in China's reported growth rate. Given the dubiousness of Chinese economic statistics, it is a good bet that actual growth is much lower than reported growth. While the extent of the discrepancy cannot be ascertained, one thing is certain: marginal demand for copper has definitely declined.

LME warehouse stocks have recently reached a new high, above the high recorded at the peak of the 2008-2009 financial crisis. What is very odd about this is that it coincides with strength in global stock markets this time around. Usually strong increases in LME copper inventories have gone hand in hand with declining economic confidence  – the previous inventory peaks have been associated with the trough in stocks in 2009 and with the two major flare-ups of the euro area debt crisis.

In any case, whatever the reason for the current dichotomy may be, the fact remains that many copper mine development projects will probably be delayed as a result. In the future, cost pressures should therefore ease.

 


 

lme-warehouse-copper-5y-Large
LME warehouse stocks of copper over the past 5 years. Previous peaks have tended to coincide with falling economic confidence and falling stock prices – click to enlarge.

 


 

Conclusion – Real Gold Price More Important Than the Nominal Price

One thing one must always keep in mind is that nominal gold prices are not  really relevant to the earnings of gold mining companies. What is relevant is the real price of gold, or the difference between their input costs and revenues. The best gains in gold stocks occurred early in the bull market when the world fell into recession in 2000-2002.

At the time, nominal gold prices rose very little compared to the prices of gold mining stocks. What drove stock prices up was the rise in the real price of gold. Nominal increases in the gold price may have a supportive psychological effect, but the market tends to produce the biggest rallies in gold stocks when gold's real price is rising or expected to rise. Much will therefore hinge on whether the idea that input costs will continue to stall or even begin to decline will turn out to be correct. Most analysts will probably miss the turning point, so it is best to pay attention to input costs and not wait for them to issue upgrades (those often enough tend to be more useful as sell signals). It is in fact possible that the turning point has already occurred.

 


 

HUI, all data chart
A long term weekly chart of the HUI index. The weekly RSI is at its lowest level ever – click to enlarge.

 


 

 

Charts by: Sharelynx, Sentimentrader, BarCharts, BigCharts, Kitco, Economagic


 

 
 

 
 

Dear Readers!

You may have noticed that our so-called “semiannual” funding drive, which started sometime in the summer if memory serves, has seamlessly segued into the winter. In fact, the year is almost over! We assure you this is not merely evidence of our chutzpa; rather, it is indicative of the fact that ad income still needs to be supplemented in order to support upkeep of the site. Naturally, the traditional benefits that can be spontaneously triggered by donations to this site remain operative regardless of the season - ranging from a boost to general well-being/happiness (inter alia featuring improved sleep & appetite), children including you in their songs, up to the likely allotment of privileges in the afterlife, etc., etc., but the Christmas season is probably an especially propitious time to cross our palms with silver. A special thank you to all readers who have already chipped in, your generosity is greatly appreciated. Regardless of that, we are honored by everybody's readership and hope we have managed to add a little value to your life.

   

Bitcoin address: 1DRkVzUmkGaz9xAP81us86zzxh5VMEhNke

   
 

2 Responses to “Why Gold Stocks Remain Subdued”

  • jimmyjames:

    Gold limping along- reviling none of its secrets as usual-as Richard Russell said… gold always does what it should do.. it just never does it when we think it should–

    • JasonEmery:

      Jimmy–Check out the following chart: go to stockcharts.com, and put in $gold (spot gold) for the symbol, and look at about 6 months worth of daily prices, with candlesticks. What really sticks out, other than the 2-day price collapse, is the size of the candlesticks, post crash.

      Look at the size of the candlesticks, pre-crash. The vast majority had daily price swings (from intra-day top to bottom) of no more than $10 or $15.

      Now look post crash. The average candle is 2.5 or 3 times as big, although the candle size has shortened a little lately. It is quite apparent that ‘they’, whoever ‘they’ is, has decided to cap gold below $1500.

      Antal Fekete has written many times on the proper way to manage a gold mine. He says, if I recall correctly, that the very best ore should be saved for a rainy day, and as the ‘real’ gold price, as Pater calls it, rises, lower and lower grades should be mined, taking advantage of the opportunity to unload what would be submarginal ore at a lower ‘real’ price.

      My guess is that mines are not managed in that way, and a lot of mines will now be uneconomic, and gold share prices won’t rise too much if gold prices go sideways, or even rise a little.

Your comment:

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • The Golden Age Has Just Begun
      Some Things Actually Go Up Before and During the Fall... In recent issues of Seasonal Insights I have discussed two asset classes that tend to suffer  performance problems in most years until the autumn, namely stocks and bitcoin. I thought you might for a change want to hear of an asset that will be in a seasonal uptrend over coming months.   Many things, including bitcoin, stocks and leaves tend to fall in the aptly named fall... but some things actually start to...
  • Adventures in Quantitative Tightening
      Flowing Toward the Great Depression All remaining doubts concerning the place the U.S. economy and its tangled web of international credits and debts is headed were clarified this week. On Monday, Mark Yusko, CIO of Morgan Creek Capital Management, told CNBC that:   “…we’re flowing toward the path of 1928-29 when Hoover was president. Now Trump is president. Both were presidents with no experience who come in with a Congress that is all Republican, lots of big promises,...
  • A Look at the Gold and Silver Price Drop of 3 July, 2017
      Mystery Nosedive The price of gold dropped from $1,241 as of Friday’s close to $1,219 on the close Monday, or -1.8%. The price of silver fell from $16.58 to $16.11, or -2.9%. It is being called a gold and silver “smash” (implication being that one party or a conspiracy is doing the smashing).   The flight of the gold rocket, different phases [PT]   Our goal is to help you develop a clear understanding. The move was no mystery. Monetary Metals makes an intensive...
  • Tales from the FOMC Underground
      A Great Big Dud Many of today’s economic troubles are due to a fantastic guess.  That the wealth effect of inflated asset prices would stimulate demand in the economy. The premise, as we understand it, was that as stock portfolios bubbled up investors would feel better about their lot in life.  Some of them would feel so doggone good they’d go out and buy 72-inch flat screen televisions and brand-new electric cars with computerized dashboards on credit.   The Wilshire...
  • How Dumb Is the Fed?
      Bent and Distorted POITOU, FRANCE – This morning, we are wondering: How dumb is the Fed? The question was prompted by this comment by former Fed insider Chris Whalen at The Institutional Risk Analyst blog.   They're not the best map readers, that much is known for certain. [PT]   [O]ur message to the folks in Jackson Hole this week [at the annual central banker meeting there] is that the end of the Fed’s reckless experiment in social engineering via QE and...
  • India: The Lunatics Have Taken Over the Asylum
      Goods and Services Tax, and Gold (Part XV) Below is a scene from anti-GST protests by traders in the Indian city of Surat. On 1st  July 2017, India changed the way it imposes indirect taxes. As a result, there has been massive chaos around the country. Many businesses are closed for they don’t know what taxes apply to them, or how to do the paperwork. Factories are shut, and businesses are protesting.   A massive anti-GST protest in Surat  [PT]   Increases...
  • The Student Loan Bubble and Economic Collapse
      The Looming Last Gasp of Indoctrination? The inevitable collapse of the student loan “market” and with it the take-down of many higher educational institutions will be one of the happiest and much needed events to look forward to in the coming months/years.  Whether the student loan bubble bursts on its own or implodes due to a general economic collapse, does not matter as long as higher education is dealt a death blow and can no longer be a conduit of socialist and egalitarian...
  • The Money Velocity Myth
      Popular Imagery of Money on the Move For most financial commentators an important factor that either reinforces or weakens the effect of changes in the money supply on economic activity and prices is the “velocity of money”.   An image from an article on the intertubes that “explains” the velocity of money (one of the articles we came across started out as follows: “The economy runs smoothly only when there is enough money in circulation. How much is enough?” ...
  • Which Is Worse? America or France?
      French Fraud POITOU, FRANCE – “Which is worse? America or France?” The question must be put in context. We were invited to dinner with local farmers last night. Jean-Yves and Arlette live in a modest house in the nearby town – an efficient and cozy place built about 25 years ago. They’ve added a solarium to the back, where we had dinner.   FAF – French-American Friendship. These days it's a “which is worse” competition... [PT]   Arlette operates a...
  • Gold and Silver Capitulation – Precious Metals Supply & Demand Report
      Last Week in Precious Metals: Peak Hype, Stocks vs. Flows and Capitulation The big news this week was the flash crash in silver late on 6 July.  We will shortly publish a separate forensic analysis of this, as there is a lot to see and say.   Silver - 1,000 troy ounce good delivery bars, approved by the COMEX. Whatever you do, do not let one of these things land your feet. For readers used to the metric system: these bars weigh approximately between 28 to 33 kilograms...
  • No “Trump Bump” for the Economy
      Crackpot Schemes POITOU, FRANCE – “Nothing really changes.” Sitting next to us at breakfast, a companion was reading an article written by the No. 2 man in France, Édouard Philippe, in Le Monde. The headline promised to tell us how the country was going to “deblock” itself.  But upon inspection, the proposals were the same old claptrap about favoring “green” energy... changing the tax code to reward one group and punish another...  and spending more money on various...
  • Putting the Latest Silver Crash Under a Lens
      An Unenthusiastic Market On Thursday, July 6, in the late afternoon (as reckoned in Arizona), the price of silver crashed. The move was very brief, but very intense. The price hit a low under $14.40 before recovering to around $15.80 which is about 20 cents lower than where it started.   1 kilogram cast silver bars from an Austrian refinery. These are available in 250 g, 500 g and 1 kg sizes and look really neat. We use the 250 g ones as paperweights, so this is an...

Support Acting Man

j9TJzzN

Austrian Theory and Investment

Own physical gold and silver outside a bank

Archive

350x200

THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts

 

Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from www.kitco.com]

 


 

USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from www.kitco.com]

 

 
Buy Silver Now!
 
Buy Gold Now!
 

Oilprice.com

savant