Author Archives: Dimitri Speck




Stretched to the Limit

There are good reasons to suspect that the bull market in US equities has been stretched to the limit. These include inter alia: high fundamental valuation levels, as e.g. illustrated by the Shiller P/E ratio (a.k.a. “CAPE”/ cyclically adjusted P/E); rising interest rates; and the maturity of the advance.


The end of an era – a little review of the mother of modern crash patterns, the 1929 debacle. In hindsight it is both a bit scary and sad, in light of the important caesura it represented. In many ways the roaring 20s were the last hurrah of a world in its death throes, a world that never managed to make a comeback. The massive expansion of the State that had begun in the years just before WW1 resumed in full force as soon as the post-war party on Wall Street ended. The worried crowd that formed in the streets around the NYSE in the week of the crash may well have suspected that the starting gun to profound change had just been fired. [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




Peculiar Behavior

As I have shown in previous issues of Seasonal Insights, various financial instruments are demonstrating peculiar behavior in the course of the week: the S&P 500 Index is typically strong on Tuesdays, Gold on Fridays and Bitcoin on Tuesdays (similar to the S&P 500 Index).


The quest for profitable foresight…[PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




Well Known Seasonal Trends

Readers are very likely aware of the “Halloween effect” or the Santa Claus rally. The former term refers to the fact that stocks on average tend to perform significantly worse in the summer months than in the winter months, the latter term describes the typically very strong advance in stocks just before the turn of the year. Both phenomena apply to the broad stock market, this is to say, to benchmark indexes such as the S&P 500 or the DJIA.


Summer and winter in the stock market…  [PT]

Illustration via CNNMoney


Read the rest of this entry »




FOMC Strategy Revisited

As readers know, investment and trading decisions can be optimized with the help of statistics. One way of doing so is offered by the FOMC meeting strategy.


The rate hikes are actually leading somewhere – after the Wile E. Coyote moment, the FOMC meeting strategy is especially useful [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




The Vote Buying Mirror

Our readers are probably aware of the influence the US election cycle has on the stock market. After Donald Trump was elected president, a particularly strong rally in stock prices ensued.  Contrary to what many market participants seem to believe, trends in the stock market depend only to a negligible extent on whether a Republican or a Democrat wins the presidency. The market was e.g. just as strong under Democratic president Bill Clinton as it was under Republican president Ronald Reagan.


The mid terms specter.


Read the rest of this entry »




Misbehaving Metals

In past issues of Seasonal Insights I have discussed the very odd behavior of a variety of instruments in the course of the typical week: in issue 17 the topic were intra-week moves in S&P 500 Index, and in issue 18 the no less interesting intra-week pattern in Bitcoin.

In issue 22 I moved on to the “Strange Behavior of Gold Investors from Monday to Thursday”, which was followed by an examination of the associated pattern in silver a week later.


The metals back when they were young. Their behavioral issues became evident at an early age already, and the passage of time has done nothing to alleviate them. Our pal palladium is a particularly obnoxious specimen, known for spending his Fridays sneaking up on and murdering unsuspecting and by now nearly extinct bears in cold blood with disconcerting regularity and great verve. [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




The Gift that Keeps on Giving

Every year a certain stock market phenomenon is said to recur, anticipated with excitement by investors: the Santa Claus rally. It is held that stock prices typically rise quite frequently and particularly strongly just before the turn of the year.


Unbeknown to many, Santa Claus paid a high price for enriching investors [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




Peculiar Behavior

In the last issue of Seasonal Insights I have shown that the gold price behaves quite peculiarly in the course of the trading week. On average, prices rise almost exclusively on Friday. It is as though investors in this market were mired in deep sleep for most of the week.


The title of this blog post is a play of words on the title of an early Wim Wender movie, The Goalkeeper’s Fear of the Penalty, which in turn is based on a famous novel by Peter Handke (sometimes the title is also translated as “The Goalie’s Anxiety at the Penalty Kick”) [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




Known and Unknown Anomalies

Readers are undoubtedly aware of one or another stock market anomaly, such as e.g. the frequently observed weakness in stock markets in the summer months, which the well-known saying “sell in May and go away” refers to. Apart from such widely known anomalies, there are many others though, which most investors have never heard of. These anomalies can be particularly interesting and profitable for investors – and there are several in the precious metals sector as well.  Today I am going to introduce one of those to you.


As Donald Rumsfeld, former secretary of defense knew, there are things we know we know, things we know we don’t know, and things we don’t know we don’t know (unfortunately he neglected to consider that there are also things we think we know that just ain’t so, such as “Saddam has WMDs” – but let’s not digress). Anyway, Seasonax knows them all! [PT]

  Read the rest of this entry »




Japanese Market About to Break Out

The Japanese stock market is quite unique: it would need to rally by approximately 80% to reach its former historical peak. What’s more, said peak was attained on the final trading day of 1989, more than 25 years ago. In short, Japanese stocks have been anything but a good investment in recent years.

Conversely this means that the market has a lot of potential if it were to return to its former heights. It also means that the Japanese market hasn’t mirrored the excesses evident in many other stock markets.  The chart below shows the Nikkei 225 since its late 1989 peak.


Nikkei 225, 1989 – 2017. Japanese stocks have entered a new uptrend. Japanese stocks are actually still quite cheap compared to current global standards. The advance looks quite good so far from a technical perspective, but unfortunately the same could be said of the 2003 to 2007 rally, which eventually fell prey to the bursting of the mortgage credit bubble in the US. While Japan’s market decoupled from foreign markets in the 1990s and remained mired in a secular bear market, it has shown no ability to decouple in the other direction since the 1970s (in the global bear market decade of the 1970s, it outperformed the DJIA roughly by a factor of 7.5). Since the BoJ is currently the biggest major currency molester in the world, a decoupling of the Japanese market in the event of a bear market taking hold elsewhere can probably not be ruled out – but we would expect that the market would at least be dragged down initially as well. This caveat has to be kept in mind when contemplating the (otherwise powerful) seasonal tendencies of the Nikkei discussed below. [PT] – click to enlarge.


Read the rest of this entry »




Bad Reputation

Years ending in 7, such as the current year 2017, have a bad reputation among stock market participants. Large price declines tend to occur quite frequently in these years.


Sliding down the steep slope of the cursed year. [PT]


Read the rest of this entry »




October is the Most Dangerous Month

The prospect of steep market declines worries investors – and the month of October has a particularly bad reputation in this respect.


Bad juju month: Statistically, October is actually not the worst month on average – but it is home to several of history’s most memorable crashes, including the largest ever one-day decline on Wall Street. A few things worth noting about 1987: 1. the crash did not presage a recession. 2. its extraordinary size was the result of a structural change in the market, as new technology, new trading methods and new hedging strategies were deployed. 3. Bernie (whoever he was/is) got six months.


Read the rest of this entry »

Most read in the last 20 days:

  • US Stock Market: Conspicuous Similarities with 1929, 1987 and Japan in 1990
      Stretched to the Limit There are good reasons to suspect that the bull market in US equities has been stretched to the limit. These include inter alia: high fundamental valuation levels, as e.g. illustrated by the Shiller P/E ratio (a.k.a. “CAPE”/ cyclically adjusted P/E); rising interest rates; and the maturity of the advance.   The end of an era - a little review of the mother of modern crash patterns, the 1929 debacle. In hindsight it is both a bit scary and sad, in...
  • How to Blow $12.2 Billion in No Time Flat
      Fake Responses  One month ago we asked: What kind of stock market purge is this?  Over the last 30 days the stock market’s offered plenty of fake responses.  Yet we’re still waiting for a clear answer.   As the party continues, the dance moves of the revelers are becoming ever more ominous. Are they still right in the head? Perhaps a little trepanation is called for to relieve those brain tensions a bit?  [PT]   The stock market, like the President,...
  • Despondency in Silver-Land
      Speculators Throw the Towel Over the past several years we have seen a few amazing moves in futures positioning in a number of commodities, such as e.g. in crude oil, where the by far largest speculative long positions in history have been amassed. Over the past year it was silver's turn. In April 2017, large speculators had built up a record net long position of more than 103,000 contracts in silver futures with the metal trading at $18.30. At the end of February of this year, they held...
  • Broken Promises
      Demanding More Debt Consumer debt, corporate debt, and government debt are all going up.  But that’s not all.  Margin debt – debt that investors borrow against their portfolio to buy more stocks – has hit a record of $642.8 billion.  What in the world are people thinking?   A blow-off in margin debt mirroring the blow-off in stock prices. Since February of 2016 alone it has soared by ~$170 billion - this is an entirely new level insanity. The current total of 643...
  • Stock and Bond Markets - The Augustine of Hippo Plea
      Lord, Grant us Chastity and Temperance... Just Not Yet! Most fund managers are in an unenviable situation nowadays (particularly if they have a long only mandate). On the one hand, they would love to get an opportunity to buy assets at reasonable prices. On the other hand, should asset prices actually return to levels that could be remotely termed “reasonable”, they would be saddled with staggering losses from their existing exposure. Or more precisely: their investors would be saddled...
  • US Stock Market – The Flight to Fantasy
      Divergences Continue to Send Warning Signals The chart formation built in the course of the early February sell-off and subsequent rebound continues to look ominous, so we are closely watching the proceedings. There are now numerous new divergences in place that clearly represent a major warning signal for the stock market. For example, here is a chart comparing the SPX to the NDX (Nasdaq 100 Index) and the broad-based NYA (NYSE Composite Index).   The tech sector is always the...
  • From Bling to Plonk – An Update on the Debt Mountain
      Serenely Grows the Debtberg We mentioned in a recent post that we would soon return to the topic of credit spreads and exotic structured products. One reason for doing so are the many surprises investors faced in the 2008 crisis. Readers may e.g. remember auction rate securities. These bonds were often listed as “cash equivalents” on the balance sheets of assorted companies investing in them, but it turned out they were anything but. Shareholders of many small and mid-sized companies...
  • US Equities – Mixed Signals Battling it Out
      A Warning Signal from Market Internals Readers may recall that we looked at various market internals after the sudden sell-offs in August 2015 and January 2016 in order to find out if any of them had provided clear  advance warning. One that did so was the SPX new highs/new lows percent index (HLP). Below is the latest update of this indicator.   HLP (uppermost panel) provided advance warning prior to the sell-offs of August 2015 and January 2016 by dipping noticeably below the...
  • Return of the Market Criers - Precious Metals Supply and Demand
      Ballistically Yours One nearly-famous gold salesman blasted subscribers this week with, “Gold Is Going to Go Ballistic!” A numerologist shouted out the number $10,000. At the county fair this weekend, we ran out of pocket change, so we did not have a chance to see the Tarot Card reader to get a confirmation. The market criers are back in gold town [PT]   Even if you think that the price of gold is going to go a lot higher (which we do, by the way—but to lean on...
  • Good Riddance Lloyd Blankfein!
      One and the Same   “God gave me my money.” – John D. Rockefeller   Today we step away from the economy and markets and endeavor down the path less traveled.  For fun and for free, we wade out into a smelly peat bog.  There we scratch away the surface muck in search of what lies below.   One should actually be careful about quotes like the one attributed to Rockefeller above, even if it of course sounds good and is very suitable for the topic at...
  • Incrementum's New Cryptocurrency Research Report
      Another Highly Useful Report As we noted on occasion of the release of the first Incrementum Crypto Research Report, the report would become a regular feature. Our friends at Incrementum have just recently released the second edition, which you can download further below (if you missed the first report, see Cryptonite 2; scroll to the end of the article for the download link).   BTC hourly (at the Bitstamp exchange). Although BTC has been in a bear market since peaking in...

Support Acting Man

Item Guides


Austrian Theory and Investment



THE GOLD CARTEL: Government Intervention on Gold, the Mega Bubble in Paper and What This Means for Your Future

Realtime Charts


Gold in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from]



Gold in EUR:

[Most Recent Quotes from]



Silver in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from]



Platinum in USD:

[Most Recent Quotes from]



USD - Index:

[Most Recent USD from]


Buy Silver Now!
Buy Gold Now!

Diary of a Rogue Economist