Author Archives: Antonius Aquinas

     

 

 

Cryptic Pronouncements

If a world conflagration, God forbid, should break out during the Trump Administration, its genesis will not be too hard to discover: the thin-skinned, immature, shallow, doofus who currently resides in the Oval Office!

 

The commander-in-chief – a potential source of radiation?

 

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Misguided Enthusiasm

While not a jubilee year, last week marked the 230th anniversary of the US Constitution. Naturally, most of its devotees enthusiastically praised the document which by now is seen on a par with Holy Writ itself.

 

The constitutional convention in Philadelphia, anno 1787. Things have gone downhill ever since. Many – though not all – of those taking part in the convention were members of the moneyed elite, the land speculators who had instigated the war of independence when King George foolishly tried to keep them from expanding their speculative activities to the West with his ill-conceived edict of 1763. Having won the war, they were no longer constrained by the edict, but they couldn’t leave well enough alone… sitting on their laurels apparently just wasn’t their style. The constitution was the next logical step – a successful attempt to install a centralized Merchant State after the British model, only sans King George. As Albert Jay Nock points out in Our Enemy, the State: “The great majority of them, possibly as many as four-fifths, were public creditors; one-third were land-speculators; some were moneylenders; one-fifth were industrialists, traders, shippers; and many of them were lawyers.” Not exactly the first thing they tell pupils in public schools about, we would guess. Nock also reminds us, ibid: “Wherever economic exploitation has been for any reason either impracticable or unprofitable, the State has never come into existence; government has existed, but the State, never”. [PT]

 

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Improving the World, One Death at a Time

If anyone should have any questions about whether the United States of America is not the most aggressive, warlike, and terrorist nation on the face of the earth, its latest proposed action against the supposed rogue state of North Korea should allay any such doubts.

 

Throughout history, the problem with empires has always been the same: no matter how stable and invincible they appeared, eventually they ran into “imperial overstretch”. At some point, the exercise of maintaining an empire simply becomes unaffordable. The deterioration usually happens very gradually, so the ruling elites will always be reluctant to admit that something needs to change. Students of history always observe with astonishment that no-one seems to be learning from history, but one’s contemporaries are always driven by  the particular pressures and exigencies of the times they live in, and trapped in their own bubble of delusions. The first sign that things are beginning to go haywire is when the frequency with which the printing press is resorted to as a means to obtain funding increases noticeably (the functional equivalent of the surreptitious reduction of the precious metals content of coins used in the more distant past). [PT]

 

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Crazed Decision

The Los Angeles City Council’s recent, crazed decision* to replace Christopher Columbus Day with one celebrating “indigenous peoples” can be traced to the falsification of history and denigration of European man which began in earnest in the 1960s throughout the educational establishment (from grade school through the universities), book publishing, and the print and electronic media.

 

Christopher Columbus at the Court of the Catholic Monarchs (a painting by Juan Cordero).  Columbus was born in the Republic of Genoa in Italy, but made his exploration voyages (four in all) under the auspices of the Spanish crown. In 1492, just after Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain had reconquered the last Muslim outpost in Spain, they finally agreed to make a deal with Columbus and funded his voyages (the crown later partly reneged on the deal, particularly with respect to the degree of political power Columbus and his appointees were allowed to wield in the new territories –  descendants of Columbus were involved in litigation over the matter until 1790). Interestingly, no contemporary portrait of Columbus exists – we have actually no idea what he really looked like. All statues and paintings of the man were made posthumously. A previous attempt to rename Columbus Day ”Indigenous People Day” in Utah was voted down by the Utah Senate in 2016. [PT]

 

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Vladimir the Great Sums Up Pope Francis the Fake

Vladimir Putin has once again demonstrated why he is the most perceptive, farsighted, and for a politician, the most honest world leader to come around in quite a while.  If it had not been for his patient and wise statesmanship, the world may have already been embroiled in an all-encompassing global conflagration with the possibility of thermonuclear destruction.

 

Vladimir Putin is sizing up Pope Francis with his “good grief, where did they find that one” stare. Since the East-West schism of AD 1054 there have been differences between the Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox Church, one of which concerns the issue of papal primacy (which the Orthodox Church rejects, although it would be prepared to acknowledge the Pope as a primus inter pares). Under Pope John Paul II previous doctrinal differences were downplayed in favor of further rapprochement. In this John Paul II followed the spirit of the decree Unitatis Redintegratio promulgated by Pope Paul IV in 1964. As the time the Catholic Church altered its stance toward the Protestant and Eastern Orthodox Churches by no longer referring to them as “heretics and schismatics”, but rather as “dissidents and separated brethren”. John Paul II went a step further by declaring that the major theological differences between East and West should be viewed as complementary rather than conflicting. Said differences concern primarily Palamist doctrine, which emerged in the 14th century in the course of the dispute over Hesychasm.  They revolve mainly around the nature of the Holy Trinity (specifically the so-called “filioque” clause, as well as Palamas’ differentiation between God’s essence and energy) and the rational (scholastic) vs. the mystical (Orthodox) approach to the faith. Laymen may well deem these controversies as examples of “how many angels can stand on the head of a pin” type disputes (consider e.g. that theologians fervently debated whether the writings of Gregory Palamas indicated that he regarded the essence-energy distinction as “real”, “virtual”, or “formal”). In times past, much could depend on how such doctrinal disagreements were resolved. Maximus the Confessor, a 7th century monk and theologian who was eventually canonized by both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches is a good example. His views on monothelitism (the interaction between Christ’s divine and human nature) initially led to his conviction as a heretic. In order to prevent him from spreading his alleged heresies, his tongue and right hand were cut off so that he could no longer speak or write and he was exiled. Less than twenty years after his death, he was fully rehabilitated; soon thereafter he began to be venerated as a saint. The East-West schism has been in place a lot longer, but a trend toward reconciliation emerged in the second half of the 20th century, with the Catholic Church adopting the view that its differences with Eastern Orthodox Churches were largely of an ecclesiastical rather than a theological nature. Most people think of the Catholic Church as inflexible, but in the words of Catholic theologian G. Philips: “The essence-energies distinction of Palamas is a typical example of a perfectly admissible theological pluralism that is compatible with the Roman Catholic magisterium”. John Paul II seems to have agreed with this view. In fact, the Eastern mystical concepts of khatarsis, theoria and theosis are far more apodictic than the rational “theological pluralism” permitted by today’s Roman Catholic Church. In short, the Eastern Orthodox Churches actually tend to be more inflexible and dogmatic in their outlook. It is little wonder that Putin – who sees himself as the temporal protector and patron of the Russian Orthodox Church – looks askance at a Pope who often sounds like a representative of Marxism-inspired “liberation theology”. [PT]

Photo credit: ANSA

 

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When Germany Was Great!

Ever since the start of the deliberately conceived “migrant crisis,” orchestrated by NWO elites, the news out of Germany has been, to say the least, horrific. Right before the eyes of the world, a country is being demographically destroyed through a coercive plan of mass migration.  The intended consequences of this – financial strain, widespread crime and property destruction, the breakdown of German culture – will continue to worsen if things are not turned around.

 

The Holy Roman Empire in 1789 AD. At the time, Germany was a patchwork of countless independent principalities, duchies, city states, bishoprics and other statelets. This was a glorious time, as citizens could very easily vote with their feet if they were unhappy with their rulers. Keep in mind, there were no such things as “passports” or “border controls” at the time. No-one even thought about such things – it would have been considered an inane notion. And although almost every statelet minted its own coins (displaying its own coat of arms and a portrait of its ruler), money was actually standardized across the entire region since the Middle Ages. Most of Germany used silver coins, which were minted according to standardized weights and sizes (gold coins were also used, but silver was more prevalent in day-to-day commerce). Thus all coins were accepted across the region, regardless of which principality or duchy had issued them. There were no tariffs either and no restrictions on cross-border investment. There was even a mechanism for reining in fiscally highly incompetent or plain crazy rulers through a supra-national arbitration body that only sprang into action upon special request (when such requests were deemed reasonable). Taxes as a rule didn’t exceed a level of 10%, as any attempt to impose higher taxes would lead to an exodus of people from the territory concerned. Not everything was perfect of course, but let us just note that despite a lack of democracy, there was no lack of freedom. Check out some of our previous articles on this topic for additional color: “Secession – An Alternative View” and “Are Nation States Beginning to Splinter?” [PT] – click to enlarge.

 

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The Looming Last Gasp of Indoctrination?

The inevitable collapse of the student loan “market” and with it the take-down of many higher educational institutions will be one of the happiest and much needed events to look forward to in the coming months/years.  Whether the student loan bubble bursts on its own or implodes due to a general economic collapse, does not matter as long as higher education is dealt a death blow and can no longer be a conduit of socialist and egalitarian nonsense for the inculcation of young minds.

 

Complain… declare bankruptcy… think for food… occupy… Decisions, decisions. [PT]

 

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Beating the War Drums at the UN

It must now be a prerequisite of those who become an American ambassador to the UN to possess certain characteristics and traits, the most important of which are rabid warmonger, child killer, and outright liar.

 

As anyone who is in possession of more than three brain cells well knows, these warmongering psychopaths couldn’t care less about the victims they use for their war propaganda. Their crocodile tears and somber faces are 100% fake – and their record speaks for itself. Every single military intervention of recent years has done nothing but create chaos and misery for millions, not to mention blowback of ever more grotesque proportions, ranging from incessant terror attacks to a veritable flood of refugees inundating the West. Never before in history has global terrorism flourished to an even remotely comparable degree than since the “global war on terror” has started (see “The Greatest Racket of All Time” for the sobering details). If you want to know why, just “follow the money”, as the saying goes. The war racket is cronyism squared, a giant horn of plenty for a fairly sizable caste of profiteers. As an aside, this particular racket is closely associated with the manner in which States have historically come into being. States were born when gangs of armed bandits decided that instead of just pillaging, raping and killing peaceful communities, it would be more lucrative to conquer them and install a giant protection racket. This principle has not changed with the adoption of democracy. Moreover, if anything, war has become more brutal, comprehensive and frequent (the draft, a form of slavery, was e.g. first introduced in the course of the French Revolution). Apart from a few notable exceptions, the concept of “collateral damage” was largely unknown in feudal times. People generally didn’t care who got to rule over them, and battles between the mercenary armies of assorted lords were often treated as public spectacles (the exceptions were in the main confined to religiously inspired conflicts). In modern democracies the the extraction of funds for the war racket from taxpayers requires pretexts, which are constantly invoked. Not surprisingly, the world has become a far more dangerous place since the end of the so-called “cold war”. [PT]

Photo credit: Rick Bajornas

 

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Convocation of the Clueless

The Trump Administration has presented the first part of its plan to overhaul a number of Wall Street financial regulations, many of which were enacted in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis.  The report is in response to Executive Order 13772 in which the US Treasury Department is to provide findings “examining the United States’ financial regulatory system and detailing executive actions and regulatory changes that can be immediately undertaken to provide much-needed relief.”*

 

Neo gets a dose of financial system red-pilling. [PT]

 

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Pushing the Global Warming Scam

Two of Europe’s greatest contemporary enemies recently got together to compare notes and discuss how they were going to further undermine and destabilize what remains of the Continent’s civilization.  Pope Francis and German Chancellor Angela Merkel met on June 17, in the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace to discuss the issues which will be raised at a Group of 20 summit meeting in Hamburg, from July 7-8.

 

Preparing for the G-20 gab fest: Pope Francis and Angela Merkel, two of the most harmful busybodies and world improvers of modern times.

Photo credit: Credit Ettore Ferrari / European Pressphoto Agency

 

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Upholding a Well-Worn Tradition

Not surprisingly, Donald Trump has followed in the infamous footsteps of his presidential predecessors in the transition from candidate to chief executive.  Invariably, every candidate for the presidency makes a whole host of promises, the vast majority of which are horrible and typically only exacerbate the problems they attempt to resolve.

 

With respect to trade, Donald Trump has adopted a position that is essentially indistinguishable from the 17th century French Mercantilism of Jean-Baptiste Colbert. It is a sure way to enrich a selected few to the detriment of the masses. At the same time, protectionism seems to superficially “make sense” to many people whose understanding of economics is not exactly the best, to put it politely (admittedly, in order to fully grasp how utterly fallacious protectionist arguments are, one has to do some reading and thinking, which is not everybody’s cup of tea). It also has a strong emotional component, as assorted foreigners are made out to be villains in its standard narrative (their “crime” consists of serving consumers by offering them win-win deals). Mainly it is a case of confusion: the ills of the fiat money system with its incessant credit expansion are erroneously blamed on free trade. [PT]

Photo credit: Gage Skidmore

 

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Papal Delusions

The purported pope of the Catholic Church recently attacked “libertarianism.”  As a number of theologians have ably shown, Jorge Bergoglio, a.k.a Pope Francis, cannot be a legitimate pope, since he was neither ordained as a priest or consecrated as a bishop in the traditional Catholic rite of Holy Orders.  And since he is not a bishop, he cannot be “Bishop of Rome” – a prerequisite for being the head of the universal Church.

 

The collectivist pope Francis – what a contrast to the revered John Paul II, who not only tirelessly argued in support of individual liberty, but had a firm grasp of economic issues as well (we have contrasted their economic views in “A Tale of Two Popes”). John Paul II realized that the Church had to stand up in defense of the free market economy if it really wanted to help the poor – and when he spoke of these things, one had the distinct impression that he really knew what he was talking about (by contrast, Francis often pontificates on things he knows nothing about, see e.g. his infamous “climate change” encyclical). As an aside: during the Nazi occupation of Poland, the then 22 year old Karol Wojtyla, who would one day become Pope John Paul II, worked as an actor in a clandestine, subversive theater. He evidently held on to this subsersive streak as he grew older – those standing up for liberty have always been the “subversives”, as they must by the very nature of their calling be opposed to the State. [PT]

 

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