Author Archives: Antonius Aquinas

     

 

 

A Brief Outbreak of Sanity

After nearly a year of gaffes, provocations, threats, bombings, destabilizing arms deals, and, most recently, the disastrous decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, the sanest member of the Trump Administration, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, appeared to have begun a new and promising diplomatic direction in relations with tiny, beleaguered North Korea.

 

Oil man and uranium man – will there be an exchange of binoculars soon? As regular readers know, after studying numerous official photographs of Kim, we have concluded that what he really wants is a pair or two of really spiffy new binoculars. International diplomacy is not exactly rocket science, one just needs to be a little observant. And giving him new field glasses would be a lot cheaper, less bloody, and less likely to generate unhealthy levels of radiation than waging war.  [PT]

Screenshot via nypost.com

 

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Rude Interruptions

As long as the US Empire can be funded and maintained on the backs of its taxpaying public, the chance of a deescalation of tensions not only on the Korean peninsula, but throughout the world are practically nil.  And as long as the nation’s current interventionist ideology holds sway, it will only be through a financial meltdown that the role of the US as global policeman will come to a much-needed end.

 

Hamhung, North Korea, June 30, 1950; an example of minor collateral damage suffered by North Korea during the behavior-modification police action of the early 1950s. Let us be clear that we have no sympathy for the hereditary Stalinist dynasty/junta oppressing the people of North Korea. Nevertheless, it should be crystal clear by now why military interventionism is problematic: it usually not only fails to achieve anything remotely resembling the desired result, in most cases it actually brings about the exact opposite. It bolsters popular support for even the vilest regimes, as the focus of the population’s anger is redirected at an external enemy; instead of destabilizing  autocrats and tyrants, it often ends up fortifying their position. Anything short of a complete victory will leave an implacable enemy in place, who as we can see in the example of North Korea can end up posing a major problem for decades. Past attempts to persuade the regime to abandon nuclear weapons (usually in exchange for economic concessions) often failed because the NK regime sabotaged them; all indications are that its decisions are driven by intense paranoia. In light of this, past agreements were often ill-conceived, as they inter alia involved the transfer of nuclear technology for supposedly “peaceful” purposes. The regime’s actions are mainly informed by a desire for self-preservation – its threats and posturing have to be seen in the context of this overarching goal. Given the deep scars left by the Korean war and the examples of tinpot dictators elsewhere who surrendered their WMD capabilities only to be hunted down and killed while their fiefdoms were bombed back into the stone age, it should not be too difficult to figure out why the NK regime wants to hang on to its nuclear weapons. [PT]

Photo credit: STR/AFP/Getty Images

 

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Expensive Politics

Instead of a demonstration of its overwhelming military might intended to intimidate tiny North Korea and pressure China to lean on its defiant communist neighbor, President Trump and the West should try to learn a few things from China.

 

President Trump meets President Xi. The POTUS reportedly had a very good time in China. [PT]

Photo credit: AP

 

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Communism: An Unmitigated Disaster

This October marks the centennial anniversary of the Bolshevik takeover of Russia and the establishment of Soviet-style Communism which tragically, for the Russian people, would last for some seventy interminable years.  Not only did the Soviet regime liquidate and imprison millions, but its idiotic system of central planning impoverished the country, turning it into an economic basket case, the effects of which reverberate to this day.

 

The communist monster – Vladimir Ulyanov, a.k.a. Lenin. The New York Times was brimming with apologias for communism on the occasion of the revolution’s centennial this year. Apparently word was given to the vast hordes of Marxists still infesting society that they were free to use the platform to publish editorials explaining why the whole thing wasn’t so bad after all. For instance, in one of these screeds we learned that Lenin was a “great environmentalist” because he decided that vast stretches of no-man’s land in the Soviet Union should be designated nature reserves. As one can easily determine by looking at a map of Russia, this is no great feat, since there are large areas with a population density reminiscent of the Sahara. Lenin’s legacy as an environmentalist certainly pales against his crimes (it was not mentioned if any “New Soviet Men” inhabited these regions and whether they were forcibly relocated or exterminated to preserve the pristine state of these areas). Lenin had second thoughts on the unworkable socialist economic system in his later years and introduced the so-called “New Economic Policy”, as the country was on the verge of suffering a famine. This concession to the superiority of capitalism was hastily reversed by Stalin at the cost of millions of lives by means of state-sponsored starvation. Food production crashed due to the coercive collectivization of all economic activity and the former “bread basket” Ukraine became the scene of one of the largest and most brutal democides in human history. But hey, Lenin was a great environmentalist! And didn’t he say that if you wanted to make an omelet, you had to break a few eggs? Stalin concluded that if you want to make a really big omelet, you have to break millions of eggs. [PT]

Photo credit: Imago

 

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Cryptic Pronouncements

If a world conflagration, God forbid, should break out during the Trump Administration, its genesis will not be too hard to discover: the thin-skinned, immature, shallow, doofus who currently resides in the Oval Office!

 

The commander-in-chief – a potential source of radiation?

 

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Misguided Enthusiasm

While not a jubilee year, last week marked the 230th anniversary of the US Constitution. Naturally, most of its devotees enthusiastically praised the document which by now is seen on a par with Holy Writ itself.

 

The constitutional convention in Philadelphia, anno 1787. Things have gone downhill ever since. Many – though not all – of those taking part in the convention were members of the moneyed elite, the land speculators who had instigated the war of independence when King George foolishly tried to keep them from expanding their speculative activities to the West with his ill-conceived edict of 1763. Having won the war, they were no longer constrained by the edict, but they couldn’t leave well enough alone… sitting on their laurels apparently just wasn’t their style. The constitution was the next logical step – a successful attempt to install a centralized Merchant State after the British model, only sans King George. As Albert Jay Nock points out in Our Enemy, the State: “The great majority of them, possibly as many as four-fifths, were public creditors; one-third were land-speculators; some were moneylenders; one-fifth were industrialists, traders, shippers; and many of them were lawyers.” Not exactly the first thing they tell pupils in public schools about, we would guess. Nock also reminds us, ibid: “Wherever economic exploitation has been for any reason either impracticable or unprofitable, the State has never come into existence; government has existed, but the State, never”. [PT]

 

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Improving the World, One Death at a Time

If anyone should have any questions about whether the United States of America is not the most aggressive, warlike, and terrorist nation on the face of the earth, its latest proposed action against the supposed rogue state of North Korea should allay any such doubts.

 

Throughout history, the problem with empires has always been the same: no matter how stable and invincible they appeared, eventually they ran into “imperial overstretch”. At some point, the exercise of maintaining an empire simply becomes unaffordable. The deterioration usually happens very gradually, so the ruling elites will always be reluctant to admit that something needs to change. Students of history always observe with astonishment that no-one seems to be learning from history, but one’s contemporaries are always driven by  the particular pressures and exigencies of the times they live in, and trapped in their own bubble of delusions. The first sign that things are beginning to go haywire is when the frequency with which the printing press is resorted to as a means to obtain funding increases noticeably (the functional equivalent of the surreptitious reduction of the precious metals content of coins used in the more distant past). [PT]

 

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Crazed Decision

The Los Angeles City Council’s recent, crazed decision* to replace Christopher Columbus Day with one celebrating “indigenous peoples” can be traced to the falsification of history and denigration of European man which began in earnest in the 1960s throughout the educational establishment (from grade school through the universities), book publishing, and the print and electronic media.

 

Christopher Columbus at the Court of the Catholic Monarchs (a painting by Juan Cordero).  Columbus was born in the Republic of Genoa in Italy, but made his exploration voyages (four in all) under the auspices of the Spanish crown. In 1492, just after Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain had reconquered the last Muslim outpost in Spain, they finally agreed to make a deal with Columbus and funded his voyages (the crown later partly reneged on the deal, particularly with respect to the degree of political power Columbus and his appointees were allowed to wield in the new territories –  descendants of Columbus were involved in litigation over the matter until 1790). Interestingly, no contemporary portrait of Columbus exists – we have actually no idea what he really looked like. All statues and paintings of the man were made posthumously. A previous attempt to rename Columbus Day ”Indigenous People Day” in Utah was voted down by the Utah Senate in 2016. [PT]

 

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Vladimir the Great Sums Up Pope Francis the Fake

Vladimir Putin has once again demonstrated why he is the most perceptive, farsighted, and for a politician, the most honest world leader to come around in quite a while.  If it had not been for his patient and wise statesmanship, the world may have already been embroiled in an all-encompassing global conflagration with the possibility of thermonuclear destruction.

 

Vladimir Putin is sizing up Pope Francis with his “good grief, where did they find that one” stare. Since the East-West schism of AD 1054 there have been differences between the Catholic and the Eastern Orthodox Church, one of which concerns the issue of papal primacy (which the Orthodox Church rejects, although it would be prepared to acknowledge the Pope as a primus inter pares). Under Pope John Paul II previous doctrinal differences were downplayed in favor of further rapprochement. In this John Paul II followed the spirit of the decree Unitatis Redintegratio promulgated by Pope Paul IV in 1964. As the time the Catholic Church altered its stance toward the Protestant and Eastern Orthodox Churches by no longer referring to them as “heretics and schismatics”, but rather as “dissidents and separated brethren”. John Paul II went a step further by declaring that the major theological differences between East and West should be viewed as complementary rather than conflicting. Said differences concern primarily Palamist doctrine, which emerged in the 14th century in the course of the dispute over Hesychasm.  They revolve mainly around the nature of the Holy Trinity (specifically the so-called “filioque” clause, as well as Palamas’ differentiation between God’s essence and energy) and the rational (scholastic) vs. the mystical (Orthodox) approach to the faith. Laymen may well deem these controversies as examples of “how many angels can stand on the head of a pin” type disputes (consider e.g. that theologians fervently debated whether the writings of Gregory Palamas indicated that he regarded the essence-energy distinction as “real”, “virtual”, or “formal”). In times past, much could depend on how such doctrinal disagreements were resolved. Maximus the Confessor, a 7th century monk and theologian who was eventually canonized by both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches is a good example. His views on monothelitism (the interaction between Christ’s divine and human nature) initially led to his conviction as a heretic. In order to prevent him from spreading his alleged heresies, his tongue and right hand were cut off so that he could no longer speak or write and he was exiled. Less than twenty years after his death, he was fully rehabilitated; soon thereafter he began to be venerated as a saint. The East-West schism has been in place a lot longer, but a trend toward reconciliation emerged in the second half of the 20th century, with the Catholic Church adopting the view that its differences with Eastern Orthodox Churches were largely of an ecclesiastical rather than a theological nature. Most people think of the Catholic Church as inflexible, but in the words of Catholic theologian G. Philips: “The essence-energies distinction of Palamas is a typical example of a perfectly admissible theological pluralism that is compatible with the Roman Catholic magisterium”. John Paul II seems to have agreed with this view. In fact, the Eastern mystical concepts of khatarsis, theoria and theosis are far more apodictic than the rational “theological pluralism” permitted by today’s Roman Catholic Church. In short, the Eastern Orthodox Churches actually tend to be more inflexible and dogmatic in their outlook. It is little wonder that Putin – who sees himself as the temporal protector and patron of the Russian Orthodox Church – looks askance at a Pope who often sounds like a representative of Marxism-inspired “liberation theology”. [PT]

Photo credit: ANSA

 

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When Germany Was Great!

Ever since the start of the deliberately conceived “migrant crisis,” orchestrated by NWO elites, the news out of Germany has been, to say the least, horrific. Right before the eyes of the world, a country is being demographically destroyed through a coercive plan of mass migration.  The intended consequences of this – financial strain, widespread crime and property destruction, the breakdown of German culture – will continue to worsen if things are not turned around.

 

The Holy Roman Empire in 1789 AD. At the time, Germany was a patchwork of countless independent principalities, duchies, city states, bishoprics and other statelets. This was a glorious time, as citizens could very easily vote with their feet if they were unhappy with their rulers. Keep in mind, there were no such things as “passports” or “border controls” at the time. No-one even thought about such things – it would have been considered an inane notion. And although almost every statelet minted its own coins (displaying its own coat of arms and a portrait of its ruler), money was actually standardized across the entire region since the Middle Ages. Most of Germany used silver coins, which were minted according to standardized weights and sizes (gold coins were also used, but silver was more prevalent in day-to-day commerce). Thus all coins were accepted across the region, regardless of which principality or duchy had issued them. There were no tariffs either and no restrictions on cross-border investment. There was even a mechanism for reining in fiscally highly incompetent or plain crazy rulers through a supra-national arbitration body that only sprang into action upon special request (when such requests were deemed reasonable). Taxes as a rule didn’t exceed a level of 10%, as any attempt to impose higher taxes would lead to an exodus of people from the territory concerned. Not everything was perfect of course, but let us just note that despite a lack of democracy, there was no lack of freedom. Check out some of our previous articles on this topic for additional color: “Secession – An Alternative View” and “Are Nation States Beginning to Splinter?” [PT] – click to enlarge.

 

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The Looming Last Gasp of Indoctrination?

The inevitable collapse of the student loan “market” and with it the take-down of many higher educational institutions will be one of the happiest and much needed events to look forward to in the coming months/years.  Whether the student loan bubble bursts on its own or implodes due to a general economic collapse, does not matter as long as higher education is dealt a death blow and can no longer be a conduit of socialist and egalitarian nonsense for the inculcation of young minds.

 

Complain… declare bankruptcy… think for food… occupy… Decisions, decisions. [PT]

 

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Beating the War Drums at the UN

It must now be a prerequisite of those who become an American ambassador to the UN to possess certain characteristics and traits, the most important of which are rabid warmonger, child killer, and outright liar.

 

As anyone who is in possession of more than three brain cells well knows, these warmongering psychopaths couldn’t care less about the victims they use for their war propaganda. Their crocodile tears and somber faces are 100% fake – and their record speaks for itself. Every single military intervention of recent years has done nothing but create chaos and misery for millions, not to mention blowback of ever more grotesque proportions, ranging from incessant terror attacks to a veritable flood of refugees inundating the West. Never before in history has global terrorism flourished to an even remotely comparable degree than since the “global war on terror” has started (see “The Greatest Racket of All Time” for the sobering details). If you want to know why, just “follow the money”, as the saying goes. The war racket is cronyism squared, a giant horn of plenty for a fairly sizable caste of profiteers. As an aside, this particular racket is closely associated with the manner in which States have historically come into being. States were born when gangs of armed bandits decided that instead of just pillaging, raping and killing peaceful communities, it would be more lucrative to conquer them and install a giant protection racket. This principle has not changed with the adoption of democracy. Moreover, if anything, war has become more brutal, comprehensive and frequent (the draft, a form of slavery, was e.g. first introduced in the course of the French Revolution). Apart from a few notable exceptions, the concept of “collateral damage” was largely unknown in feudal times. People generally didn’t care who got to rule over them, and battles between the mercenary armies of assorted lords were often treated as public spectacles (the exceptions were in the main confined to religiously inspired conflicts). In modern democracies the the extraction of funds for the war racket from taxpayers requires pretexts, which are constantly invoked. Not surprisingly, the world has become a far more dangerous place since the end of the so-called “cold war”. [PT]

Photo credit: Rick Bajornas

 

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